New PDF release: A society without fathers or husbands: the Na of China

By Cai Hua

ISBN-10: 1890951129

ISBN-13: 9781890951122

The Na of China, farmers within the Himalayan sector, stay with no the establishment of marriage. Na brothers and sisters reside jointly their complete lives, sharing loved ones obligations and elevating the women's teenagers. as the Na, like several cultures, limit incest, they perform a process of occasionally furtive, occasionally conspicuous evening encounters on the woman's domestic. The woman's partners--she usually has greater than one--bear no monetary accountability for her or her youngsters, and "fathers," except they resemble their childrens, stay unidentifiable.This lucid ethnographic research indicates how a society can functionality with out husbands or fathers. It sheds gentle on marriage and kinship, in addition to on the location of ladies, the mandatory stipulations for the purchase of id, and the impression of a communist country on a society that it considers backward.

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The Na of China, farmers within the Himalayan zone, dwell with no the establishment of marriage. Na brothers and sisters reside jointly their whole lives, sharing loved ones duties and elevating the women's young ones. as the Na, like several cultures, limit incest, they perform a approach of occasionally furtive, occasionally conspicuous evening encounters on the woman's domestic.

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Those sent by their ascendants to the zhifu because of dis­ obedience. 5. Descendants from other ethnic groups who went to Yong­ ning and, unable to find other employment, worked in the zhifu's home as servants in order to survive. 6. Those who, unable to pay a debt, were brought to work in the home of their creditor or of the zhifu. For example: (a) The Shadga lienee from the village of Ago was indebted to a lienee from Dzebo. Because it was unable to pay off the debt, Samu, one of the daughters, was taken away as a serf.

If cohabitation took place in a virilocal residence, which was always the case, the rule was also male-lineal. pi stratum, regardless of their 50 S O C I A L S T R A T I F I C A T I O N U N T I L 1 9 5 6 mother's status. In cases of the visit, the children always inherited their mother's status, no matter what the stratum of her visitors. Other combinations that could be logically surmised did not exist in practice for the men and women of the si'pi stratum. This can be explained by the simple fact that si'pi lianees always con­ trolled the modality of sexual life practiced by their members, with the result that their descendants did not become dzeka or we.

The people of Yongning keep an eye on strangers, especially researchers. Each time someone comes to the area to gather in­ formation about their customs, the villagers immediately inform those in charge. My first trip there was no exception. " He added: "The people here have already vowed that if they ever set foot in Yongning again, they will kill them. " I tried to explain that the theory that had guided those first researchers was called evolutionism and that my point of view was entirely differ­ ent, that previous researchers had not understood the Na tradi­ tions, and this was only another reason to undertake a new study, in order to make the truth known.

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A society without fathers or husbands: the Na of China by Cai Hua


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